Sarah
15 December 2008 @ 05:46 pm
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I was lucky enough to read an early release of this romance and it was fun stuff!
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Sarah
31 August 2008 @ 08:02 pm
I'd love a chance to win this contest Ms. Singh! I love your books, so here goes:

* Which fictional hero (from books, tv, movies...) would you most like to hold hostage?

Zachary Bronson from Lisa Kleypas' Where Dreams Begin or Bobby Tom Denton from Susan Elizabeth Phillips Heaven, Texas. Or... Marshall Erickson from TV's How I Met Your Mother. I find them all sexy in different ways.

* Which fictional hero would you most like to be held hostage by?

Hm...Ok, I know this is a totally different choice but man, I love Gray Rouillard from Linda Howard's After the Night. He would make one fine kidnapper.

* Which fictional world would you most like to be held hostage in?

Honestly, I have no idea. Anythingin historical Regency England maybe. I scare easily so I'm not sure if a paranormal world would work for me.

So, Nalini Singh is having a contest for her newest release, Hostage to Pleasure. Go ENTER! She is giving away a $75.00 gift certificate to the online bookstore of your choice. That is awesome.

You know you want to read this book:

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If you like paranormal romance at all, I highly recommend her series. This is one of the best on the market at this time. Kind of a fun combination of paranormal and sci-fi, not something I'm normally interested in but she is such a skilled world builder, it makes all the difference.
 
 
Sarah
10 June 2008 @ 02:17 pm
Wake by Lisa McMann which I really, really enjoyed. I've always been interested in dreams and I thought the author used the idea of dreams rather creatively. Plus, I really liked the main protaginist, Janie, and her developing relationship with bad boy Cabel. A second book is planned. I hope it's just as good because on the one hand, I can easily see the author taking this idea, of being able to step into people's dreams, in a bad direction, or just in a direction that would be rather ordinary in comparison with the first book.

I also just finished Perfect You by Elizabeth Scott. I really enjoyed this one too. heyheyrenay gives a much better review of just why the story worked so well so I'll just refer you to her LJ. But yeah, really enjoyed this one. Both these books were YA. I love me some YA. So much.

Currently reading Love the One You're With by Emily Giffin. It's chick-lit in a way, but it's very well done chick lit. This is the author who got me to read a book (Something Borrowed) and actually enjoy a story where the main female character has an affair with the fiance of her best friend. Usually I hate adultery storylines with a passion but this one really worked for me.

Brief write-ups, I know, but my head has really been in library management lately so I haven't had time to process my reading as much as I'd like.
 
 
Sarah
20 May 2008 @ 01:52 pm
I finally finished The Goose Girl by Shannon Hale last night. I've been reading this book for like two months or so. That is a record for me. I can usually finish a book very quickly but this one was slow going. I wanted to stick it out though. Wasn't the best book I ever read but it Hale has a beautiful writing style and that kept me hooked more than the story probably. The first part was just really slow going for me. But, I'm glad it's done. Next up: I decided to splurge and buy Stephenie Meyer's The Host since I received a B&N gift card for graduation. I figured since it was so long and with school going still, I can read it more leisurely without worrying about having to return it as a library book.

I've been neglecting this journal majorly. Hopefully once I get more time for fun reading, I'll be able to keep this better updated.
 
 
Sarah
29 February 2008 @ 03:36 pm
The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by John Boyne.

It was an ok read. I love stories set in the Holocaust/WWII time period as most know, b ut this just didn't develop many of the sad, tragic, and hopeful moments that I usually feel when reading stories set in this time period.

Heck, I even predicted the ending which is something I can very rarely do with books or tv. I'm not good at it.

It was an ok read overall. It's marketed as YA but personally, with the main character being 9 years old in the story, it felt like more of a "tweener" novel, even something a sixth or seventh grader could read.

Also, the author totally kept switching between "pajamas" and "pyjamas" which was annoying as heck. He needed a better editor I think, unless there is some obvious difference between the two that I know nothing about.
 
 
Sarah
20 January 2008 @ 04:17 pm
Just finished M.T. Anderson's Feed and all I can say is wow. I'm not usually one to pay homage to book awards as I don't always think the best book wins but in this case, I think the awards this book has won and been nominated for are well deserved.

# Finalist 2002 National Book Award for Young People's Literature
# Winner 2003 Boston Globe-Horn Book Award for Fiction
# Winner 2003 Golden Duck Awards Hal Clement Award for Young Adults
# Nominee 2005-2006 Green Mountain Book Award

I don't want to give the summary away but you can read it both at Amazon and Wikipedia. All I can say is, it was, for me, a really amazing story in that it just mirrors so much of American society today and the possibilities of what it could conceivably and unfortunately become.

It's kind of a sci-fi/fantasy novel, I'm not sure how you would honestly categorize it. I choose it off my YA Material's reading list for the week, just on a whim, and I'm so glad I did.

I will admit it took me a while to truly appreciate it because frankly, it starts off oddly in some ways, especially the language and how it is used (and not used). You will soon realize that language is key to the story but it really had me wondering if I wanted to keep reading. Anderson really stresses the importance of words, or reading, and even of an oral culture. It is all worked in very well to the novel but as a person of words myself, I really paid attention to those messages.

I probably wouldn't have picked it up if it hadn't been on my class list and I had overheard someone in class talking about it but I'm glad I did. If you decide to read it, please let me know what you think.
 
 
Sarah
19 January 2008 @ 05:42 pm
Figured it's time I use my sadly neglected book journal.

I finished Ender's Game yesterday and I thoroughly enjoyed it, even as it left me feeling a bit depressed.

I just loved Ender. For real, I want to name a pet after him in the future. Now I am not a sci-fi fan in the slightest, at all. I don't think this book will change that but... on the other hand, it was a great story. It had a lot of elements I enjoy in regular fiction (hardships, people overcoming obstacles, friendship, etc) but all set up in a slightly different way.

I would highly recommend reading this book, even if, like myself, you are not a sci-fi fan. Orson Scott Card really created this scary but yet beautiful story and its main fabulousness resides with Ender.

I don't really want to read any of the books after this one though because they don't sound quite as good. Maybe they are for all I know but I have enough reading on my plate as it is.

Up next: Feed by M.T. Anderson, Mr. White's Confession by Robert Clark, and a couple of Sonya Sones stories (she is a YA writer.)
 
 
Sarah
05 December 2007 @ 02:20 pm
Christmas Meme:

1. What is your favorite Christmas romance to re-read each year?
Hm, I don't think I have one in particular. In fact, I cannot think of a holiday story I really truly enjoy, and this is odd because I love Christmas. Maybe Lisa Kleypas' short story, "I Will."

2. What is your favorite Christmas movie/show?
SO MANY! Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer stands out as the FAVORITE favorite, but I also love A Christmas Story, The Year Without a Santa Claus, Santa Claus is coming to Town, The Grinch.. um, yeah, there are more too.

3. What is your favorite Christmas cookie?
The sugar cookie. I only make sugar cookies during Christmas time so it's a very special treat to make and then eat them and hand them out. Oh yes, and I love the peanut butter blossom too!

4. When do you start Christmas shopping?
Way later than I should. I've barely started and it is the fifth already.

5. Do you re-gift?
Nope. I think it's just tacky and frankly, I'd rather return it and keep the money or in-store credit for myself.

6. What is your favorite Christmas song?
"If Every Day Was Like Christmas" by Elvis Presley

7. When do you get your Christmas tree?
I have a fake tree. I put it up the day after Thanksgiving without fail. I've never had a real tree at my own home. Though I have helped cut them down occasionally.

8. Wrapping presents: Love it or hate it?
Kind of indifferent to it. I'm not very good at it, but I don't hate it. It's just part of the holidays.

9. Who is the hardest person to buy for?
My mom. She never tells me what she wants. She always says she has everything she needs. Then I am forced to rack my brain to think of something to buy.

10. Christmas tree: Real or artificial?
I'm all about the artificial frankly. I know it doesn't have the smell, but it just makes putting up a tree that much easier.

This meme comes from The Book Binge. Do this at your own journal and you too may have the chance to win an ebook reader!
 
 
Sarah
27 October 2007 @ 08:44 pm
The Sweet Far Thing by Libba Bray. It is the third in her trilogy.

IT HAS BEEN A YEAR OF CHANGE since Gemma Doyle arrived at the foreboding Spence Academy. Her mother murdered, her father a
laudanum addict, Gemma has relied on an unsuspected strength and has discovered an ability to travel to an enchanted world called the realms, where dark magic runs wild. Despite certain peril, Gemma has bound the magic to herself and forged unlikely new alliances. Now, as Gemma approaches her London debut, the time has come to test these bonds.

The Order - the mysterious group her mother was once part of - is grappling for control of the realms, as is the Rakshana. Spence's burned East Wing is being rebuilt, but why now? Gemma and her friends see Pippa, but she is not the same. And their friendship faces its gravest trial as Gemma must decide once and for all what role she is meant for.


I highly recommend this series, I think it is leaps and bounds above the Twilight series which everyone loves so much. Granted, I do like Twilight, but I love the Victorian setting of these books, it's spooky and mysterious and Kartik, the gypsy boy, is sexy! Plus, I think the covers are gorgeous. The books in the series are: A Great and Terrible Beauty and Rebel Angels.

Hush by Donna Jo Napoli

Melkorka is a princess, the first daughter of a magnificent kingdom in

mediæval Ireland -- but all of this is lost the day she is kidnapped

and taken aboard a marauding slave ship. Thrown into a world that she has

never known, alongside people that her former country's laws regarded as

less than human, Melkorka is forced to learn quickly how to survive.

Taking a vow of silence, however, she finds herself an object of

fascination to her captors and masters, and soon realizes that any power,

no matter how little, can make a difference.

Based on an ancient Icelandic saga, award-winning author Donna Jo Napoli

has crafted a heartbreaking story of a young girl who must learn to forget

all that she knows and carve out a place for herself in a new world -- all

without speaking a word.

I know this one is out now but I'm going to have to wait until the semester is over to read it. Too much to do.

The Luxe by Anna Godbersen

Beautiful sisters Elizabeth and Diana Holland rule Manhattan's social scene. Or so it appears. When the girls discover their status among New York City's elite is far from secure, suddenly everyone—from the backstabbing socialite Penelope Hayes, to the debonair bachelor Henry Schoonmaker, to the spiteful maid Lina Broud—threatens Elizabeth's and Diana's golden future.

With the fate of the Hollands resting on her shoulders, Elizabeth must choose between family duty and true love. But when her carriage overturns near the East River, the girl whose glittering life lit up the city's gossip pages is swallowed by the rough current. As all of New York grieves, some begin to wonder whether life at the top proved too much for this ethereal beauty, or if, perhaps, someone wanted to see Manhattan's most celebrated daughter disappear...

In a world of luxury and deception, where appearance matters above everything and breaking the social code means running the risk of being ostracized forever, five teenagers lead dangerously scandalous lives. This thrilling trip to the age of innocence is anything but innocent.


Look at that cover on Amazon, it's gorgeous! I think this book sounds amazing. King of a historical Gossip Girl, lol.
 
 
Sarah
05 October 2007 @ 05:42 pm
Eclipse by Stephenie Meyer and to be honest, I was totally prepared to dislike it based on others comments and the spoilers I had read read more with SPOILERS!Collapse )

All in all, not stellar, but I will say it held my attention pretty consistently.

Now, I'm reading Garden Spells by Sarah Addison Allen.